Comprehension Corner

What Are Fix-Up Strategies?
Comprehension Corner
What Strategies Do Good Readers Use?
What Are Fix-Up Strategies?
What Are Comprehension Constructors?
How Do I Use Modeling Effectively?
What Are Accessible Texts?
What Are Text Sets?
How Do I Make Reading More Purposeful?
How Do I Improve Group Work?
What Does Engaging Instruction Look Like?
How Do I Promote Transfer?
What Strategies Promote Comprehension?
What Are Inquiry Units?
How Do I Create Opportunities for Social Learning?
How Do I Promote Questioning?
Where Can I Learn More?
Meet the Author

Tovani writes that, “Good readers monitor their comprehension.  They know when the text is making sense and when it isn’t.  They recognize signals that indicate when they are understanding what they are reading, and when they are confused.  Good readers separate themselves from struggling readers when they recognize that they are confused and then do something to repair meaning.  Good readers use “fix-up” strategies, which can be taught to readers at any age.”  A fix-up strategy is defined as any strategy used by a reader to help get unstuck when the text becomes confusing.

 

Fix-Up Strategies

         Make a connection between the text and the following:

o   your life

o   your knowledge of the world 

o   another text

         Make a prediction.

         Stop and think about what you have already read.

         Ask yourself a question and try to answer it.

         Reflect in writing about what you have read.

         Visualize.

         Use print conventions.

         Retell what you’ve read.

         Reread.

         Notice patterns in text structure.

         Adjust your reading rate: slow down or speed up.

 

More Tips for Getting “Unstuck”

  • Trust the author. Don’t panic if at first the text doesn’t make sense.  The author will slowly tell you more to help clear up confusion.
  • Ask questions.  Someone else may have the same question, or someone else may be able to help you.
  • Slow down.  Read, reread, and retell what you’ve read.
  • It’s okay to go back! Sometimes readers go back and reread confusing parts.

 

For further reading, see Do I Really Have to Teach Reading, Chapters 1 and 6.

Last updated: July 9, 2008

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